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Posts Tagged ‘Rolling Shutter’

Wet noodles for drumsticks? NO! it’s CMOS video!

September 19, 2009 Leave a comment

picture-13.pngWith all the rage about the Canon 5DmII for video, and everyone all gaga over the shallow depth of field video for a pretty inexpensive price, you have to remember that with every silver lining, there is a cloud… or something like that.

A nice new music video demonstrates that it’s not just camera motion that CMOS chips distort from reality, even motion within the frame, like a drummer drumming (something drummers in bands simply insist on doing constantly, throughout the whole darn song.)

If you want to have your wet noodle video featured on America’s Funniest Home Videos, then shoot it with a DSLR. Giggle-inducing images after the break. Read more…

The Foundry offers fix for CMOS “Rolling Shutter”

August 12, 2009 Leave a comment

rolshutfix.jpgAfter seeing their corrected footage, I have to say, wow.

Not only does it seem to properly recognize the distortion and correct it, it lets you calibrate it for specific cameras, and it doesn’t correct the whole image, just what moves- so an object moving in the frame (like the bus) is fixed while the street poles are left alone (which a “global adjustment” would distort.)

Hey camera manufacturers… there’s code that solves the problem.
Now you can fix it in the camera and save us the headache of having to process all our footage after the fact.

Very convincing video demo after the break. Read more…

HD Everywhere?

February 19, 2009 1 comment

samsung-omniahd.jpg

Well, the 2009 Photo Marketing Association’s annual conference is March 3-5 and it’s expected that most everyone who hasn’t already announced a still camera capable of HD video recording— will at the event. This is not to say that video camcorders are not needed any more. I have already shot video with these new “HD-capable” still cameras… and let me tell all the video camcorders out there: your jobs are secure.

The other shoe to drop recently is the first cell phone to tout HD video recording capability. Personally, I am hoping for about 5 MP of quality pictures, but HD video? I doubt it. The proof will be in the pudding when these things actually ship and the video makes its way onto the web for everyone to critically assess.

Either way, the main problem these devices have, aside from the complete lack of control of “camera” functions while shooting, is video that is plagued with problems… Read more…

Sony PMW-EX1 CMOS FAILS Strobe Test.

January 2, 2008 14 comments

ex1lead.jpgFreshDV shot some interesting footage with the Sony PMW-EX1 and video of a police car with numerous strobes firing clearly demonstrated that Sony’s new flagship SxS camcorder, despite being knighted with the CineAlta badge, clearly has problems with capturing partial-second instances of time.

There is going to be trouble in Teaneck

Read more…

Red Rolling CMOS Shutter Redux, again.

December 17, 2007 1 comment

redstrobe.jpgOne of the easiest ways to f— with video is to use flashes and strobes while shooting.

With CCDs, you’ll likely end up with one field of interlaced video completely blown out and the other “half” of the image is normally exposed. Apparently, with CMOS imagers, including the soon to be replaced first 100 RED cameras, strobes and flashes can look like this, where only part of the frame is illuminated. Odd, isn’t it.

The video on the Fini Films Site has lots of strobes popping, and most are captured properly, but a good portion- more than you would expect- aren’t.

Via FreshDV Read more…

Red rolling shutter redux

November 1, 2007 3 comments

fans.jpgThere’s been a bit of discussion about the image distortion caused by the scanning (rolling) shutter used by CMOS chips which are starting to proliferate in the prosumer and professional video camera world. The key problem, as I have mentioned previously, is that the scanning imaging device is no longer sending the image solely to scanning displays- i.e. tube televisions. Today’s displays include plasma, LCD, DLP, OLED, etc. Most are progressive, but some include circuitry to display the image as if it were a scanning device.

Confused yet?

Mike Curtis, of HD For Indies, is very heavy into RED usage and promotion on his web site. RED is the video camera that I will agree is changing, or will change, the hardware business in the video industry. I checked in with Mike about the “rolling shutter” issue…

Read more…