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Posts Tagged ‘HDTV’

1000 MBps read & 900 MBps write in a non-retina MacBook Pro.

July 2, 2012 Leave a comment

Kick ass performance with two SSDs in one laptop.

Considering that all the other components (memory capacity, processor speed, bus speed) can be configured nearly identically, just dropping a single OWC 6G SSD into your a 2012 MacBook Pro 15 can boost its performance on par with, or even a little past) the MacBook Pro with Retina Display.

But wait… the MacBook Pro 15” has two drive bays, each capable of running an OWC 6G SSD at full 6Gb/s speeds.

Two drives…

Same speed…

You know where this is going…

Yes, we decided to go all out and put the two drives in a Striped RAID to see how fast we could get.

With this setup, we averaged over 1000MB/s read speeds and write speeds that nearly hit 900MB/s. That completely blows the MacBook Pro with Retina Display out of the water!

OWC SSDs Make 2012 MBP 15″ a Speed Champ | Other World Computing Blog.

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Mastering the Dallas Screenwriter’s Association – 2011 Short Film Showcase

November 15, 2011 1 comment

What does it take to master 11 DVD’s, 4 WMVs, and 3 .mov’s onto one disc? Not a lot. But it does take a thorough of understanding what goes into mastering a DVD and what the shortest distance is between Source and Delivery.

The Dallas Screenwriters Association had gathered more than 12 movies for it’s 2011 Showcase. Add to this some PSA’s and some new media created specifically for this program, and you have the makings for a special challenge. But there’s a way around this potentially tricky multiformat maze that enabled the finished DVD to be delivered in just a couple days- and that includes delays for work on other projects, and the need to create a few new media bits. Read more…

IEBA Review: Datavideo DN-60 Solid State CF Card Recorder

February 11, 2011 1 comment

When it comes to camcorders, most everything is moving to flash media.

There are, however, an incredible amount of HDV and other tape-based HD camcorders out there, still working hard and producing great images. How do you get these camcorders up to speed with the new flash-media workflow? With an external recorder.

Thus far, the need for external devices to record HD footage has primarily been served by Focus Enhancements’ FireStore line. However, there has been growth in the segment recently and Datavideo has entered the fray with a unique design and price point under $500. Does the Datavideo DN-60 Solid State CF Card Recorder give the more expensive recorders a run for their money? Let’s find out. Read more…

vDSLRs are not smaller & lighter, nor cheaper.

January 17, 2011 19 comments

When I started in the video biz, I had a 3-chip Sony M7 cabled to a separate VO8800 3/4 SP deck with 20-minute tapes and two batteries. It produced very pretty images. Today I carry a phone that shoots HD. My phone is smaller and lighter than the camcorders I started with.

But I am so very tired of vDSLR (HDSLR, EVIL, whatever) fanatics touting that one of the greatest features of the format is that they are so “run & gun” so “small & light” and yet offer so much capability. You mean like full HD output on a big screen, built in stereo audio, XLR inputs, audio metering, waveform, headphone outputs, multiple HD video outputs, on-shoulder balance, easy to toggle and adjust manual settings for focus, zoom, iris, shutter, gain and white balance while shooting? Able to shoot for hours at a time for live events? You know, those features, aside from “it looks pretty” that professionals need all the time?

Well, it turns out that the smaller & lighter vDSLRs can indeed offer many of those features, by throwing away the notion of smaller & lighter. So I wish people would stop touting it as a “you get smaller & lighter AND you get real pro camcorder features.” Read more…

The Megapixel Myth is finally reaching manufacturer’s ears.

August 17, 2010 1 comment

Nikon’s P7000 increased the model number from the previous model’s P6000, but actually decreases the pixel count on the chip, while increasing the size of the chip. Both factors serve to allow more light into the camera, let the camera record images with less noise, and require less noise reduction, which can obliterate fine detail.

Why the change?

Because Manufacturers are finally hearing the siren call from consumer and pundits who have proved, time and again, that increasing megapixels does not mean better pictures. After a certain point, the optics aren’t even good enough to focus all three colors onto the same pixel, and you get awful chromatic aberration.

But more importantly than that, a faster chip, and faster glass, means you can take great photos in more lighting conditions– like indoors, like at night, and it means that those photos will look better, with less blurred motion, or noise from gain. Moreover, it has the side effect of making the tiny built-n flash seem more powerful. Read more…

Decent Video Gets Cheaper & Cheaper. Here’s a $25 SD demo.

July 6, 2010 Leave a comment

Some fellow video friends of mine has been sharing some surprisingly good video from a Coby camera that they purchased for around $25 as an impulse by at a drugstore checkout. They’ve attached this camera to their motorcycle and aside from the glaring CMOS “jellocam” the image and sound quality is surprisingly good. Read more…

Sony gears up for Blu-ray 3D mastering and production in Japan

June 29, 2010 1 comment

scope in 3D roomI spoke recently for the DFW-Professional Videographer’s Association and during the Dallas Producer’s Association’s “Production Roundup” about the critical importance of using video scopes while shooting, and in editing. It can be said many different ways but simply, if you understand the importance of using an audio meter to know the difference between audio that is too hot or too quiet, then a waveform monitor is the same thing for video– just as essential.

The headphone volume knob can be adjusted any number of ways, the meter is the only objective measurement. So, too, a video monitor can be adjusted any number of ways, and a scope is the only objective way to measure and calibrate your video. Read more…

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