The Megapixel Myth is finally reaching manufacturer’s ears.

Nikon’s P7000 increased the model number from the previous model’s P6000, but actually decreases the pixel count on the chip, while increasing the size of the chip. Both factors serve to allow more light into the camera, let the camera record images with less noise, and require less noise reduction, which can obliterate fine detail.

Why the change?

Because Manufacturers are finally hearing the siren call from consumer and pundits who have proved, time and again, that increasing megapixels does not mean better pictures. After a certain point, the optics aren’t even good enough to focus all three colors onto the same pixel, and you get awful chromatic aberration.

But more importantly than that, a faster chip, and faster glass, means you can take great photos in more lighting conditions– like indoors, like at night, and it means that those photos will look better, with less blurred motion, or noise from gain. Moreover, it has the side effect of making the tiny built-n flash seem more powerful. Continue reading “The Megapixel Myth is finally reaching manufacturer’s ears.”

What do you store your hard drives in? Here’s some great 3.5-Inch SATA/ IDE Hard Drive Protection

drive in caseLooking for a way to protect your backup drives (especially if you use a drop-in dock like I do) then consider these handy little cases, which protect the drive from static, dust, spiders, etc.

I personally like to get a 1 TB drive per client/project and then, when that project is done, or awaiting approval, I pull it out of the dock and put it on the shelf to work on other projects.  The advantage of putting the drive in a case, aside from the protection, is that I  can put some very big labels with lots of notes about what’s on the drive, which is usually a lot of stuff.

Dell UltraSharp U3011 a 30-inch IPS monitor for critical color grading.

There’s a great article on the Pro Video Coalition about doing critical color grading using the latest generation of “in plane switching” IPS LCD monitors which offer the widest gamut of color and accuracy yet achieved on LCD monitors.

I bring this up because Dell has just announced a 30″ IPS monitor that may well be the de-facto choice for color grading do to its sheer size (as far as computer monitors go) and high resolution for a great price.

You see, whereas “broadcast” monitors cost a hefty premium, say $3000 and up for critical color work, these “consumer” monitors brandish price tags around $1000 and can be calibrated to work for critical color post. Continue reading “Dell UltraSharp U3011 a 30-inch IPS monitor for critical color grading.”

Wanted: Home Theatre PC Made Simple.

I have been thinking about replacing my aged TiVo box (SD) with an HD version, especially to record HD content off cable and to get Netflix streaming. I was wondering why not a Home Theatre PC (HTPC) and came across this Engadget article that compared TiVo’s latest product: “Premiere” to a properly kitted Windows Media Center HTPC. In the end, each has strengths, and weaknesses. I personally would like a solution that has a built-in audio amplifier so I don’t need yet ANOTHER remote to control THAT.  So, for the sake of Simplicity, and the hodge-podge that is the Premiere interface, I may just go with an older TiVo HD. Wait, do they do Netflix? Hmmm, more research is needed.

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Continue reading “Wanted: Home Theatre PC Made Simple.”

OWC eSATA Upgrade Program for Apple iMac 27″ 2010 Models

Well, it’s finally happened. And the expert gurus at Other World Computing are the ones that made it happen, again. Giving Mac users the capabilities and features that our PC brethren have been enjoying for years now- eSATA ports.

Apple’s latest computers have Intel Core i3, i5 and i7 processors. Decent graphics power, and beautiful IPS displays, but seriously lack for fast external disk I/O.

Apple has standardized on the obsoleted FireWire 800, but  the rest of the industry has already forgotten about FireWire. They have moved on to eSATA for speeds in the hundreds of MB per second as opposed to FW800’s mere 60 MBps or so. So a Mac user who wanted to use eSATA drives had to have a computer they to which they could add an eSATA card (Mac Pro or 17″ MacBook Pro). But OWC changes that game today. Continue reading “OWC eSATA Upgrade Program for Apple iMac 27″ 2010 Models”

Canon XF300 on the way for review. Questions? Tests? [UPDATE] It’s here.

Canon says that the Canon XF300 Professional Camcorder is on it’s way to me for test & review. This camera features 50Mbps MPEG-2 4:2:2 recording to Compact Flash (CF) Cards. This high data rate should push aside all issue with compression, even though it does use the older MPEG-2 codec as opposed to the newer MPEG-4 / H.264 / AVCHD codec that a lot of newer camcorders and cameras use. The advantage to MPEG-2 is that, with a lot less compression, today’s even faster computer should handle it with ease, as opposed to the much more difficult time today’s systems have with AVCHD footage. Continue reading “Canon XF300 on the way for review. Questions? Tests? [UPDATE] It’s here.”

How NOT to treat production professionals.

I can understand shrinking budgets. I can understand low budget production, I can understand working for free. But so many of these videos have popped up in the past year or so that it demonstrates a bit of push-back: the abuse of production professionals is really becoming an epidemic.

If two ops, a camera package, with ENG audio and basic lights used to cost $1200/10 then why do producers, or corporate people who are needing a video made, somehow think it’s now okay to pay $500 for it? Continue reading “How NOT to treat production professionals.”

Don’t miss a TechThought. E-mail subscriptions now available.

Sure RSS is fancy, there’s Twitter & Facebook… but if you subscribe to enough stuff, or get busy on a project, you are simply not going to scroll through pages of stuff to try and make sure you didn’t miss a phenomenal article from me. Well, now you can subscribe by e-mail.

When I post, You’ll get an e-mail that will just sit in your in-bin till you have the time. I use it to follow other essential blogs and find it far better than chasing down good info through so many other various methods– especially since e-mail is an absolute requirement when it comes to business tools. Facebook, Twitter, RSS, etc, not so much. Computers should be doing the work for us, and e-mail subscriptions make that happen.

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Sony accepts orders for NEX-VG10: the large sensor camcorder gets REAL!

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Sony is clearly sprinting to the large sensor HD camcorder finish line!

Looks like the race is over. Sony and Panasonic announced large sensor camcorders back at NAB but now Sony is showing off the goods. They are taking pre-orders starting today.

The goods Sony is offering look real good! As with many of the last consumer/prosumer models, you can expect the VG10 to come out in a prosumer model, with XLR inputs, and probably more video settings than the consumer model offers. But probably no different lenses.

The Alpha lenses from the digital still lineup are already designed to resolve far, far beyond the 2 Megapixels of 1080i60 HD video. So you probably won’t see different lenses than will be available in the consumer lineup, but it does open the door to the entire Minolta Maxxum line of SLR lenses, which are the basis for the Sony’s Alpha. Continue reading “Sony accepts orders for NEX-VG10: the large sensor camcorder gets REAL!”

Pandigital Personal Photo Scanner writes to memory cards

The act of scanning a photo hasn’t changed since scanning was invented. Sitting at a computer, waiting for software to figure out what the next step is, waiting while the scanner moans through a scan, waiting while the software shows you the image, waiting while you save the file to disk, waiting, waiting, waiting. Which is probably why a lot of people don’t bother to scan all the stuff they should be archiving.

Pandigital’s latest, the Personal Photo Scanner, helps to cut down on that process by eliminating the computer as part of the scanning process. Continue reading “Pandigital Personal Photo Scanner writes to memory cards”

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